Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (212 KB)

Title: Selection of species and sampling areas: The importance of inference

Author: Corn, Paul Stephen;

Date: 2009

Source: In: Dodd, C. Kenneth, Jr., editor. Amphibian ecology and conservation: A handbook of techniques. Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press. p. 431-446.

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

Description: Inductive inference, the process of drawing general conclusions from specific observations, is fundamental to the scientific method. Platt (1964) termed conclusions obtained through rigorous application of the scientific method as "strong inference" and noted the following basic steps: generating alternative hypotheses; devising experiments, the results of which will exclude one or more hypotheses; conducting the experiment to get a "clean result"; and repeating the process with revision based on the information obtained. Every student is exposed to these basics in introductory courses, and a considerable proportion of a modern graduate education in the sciences is devoted to acquiring the analytic (statistical) skills necessary to apply the scientific method. Not even considering the field of mathematical statistics or applied statistics in disciplines such as social sciences, library shelves groan under the weight of texts on applied statistics, ranging from introductory (Hayek and Buzas 1997) to advanced (Williams et al. 2002), for conducting research in ecology, and new works are published every year. Much effort is currently devoted to the mechanisms of analysis and the issues involved in choosing among statistical methods; specifically, traditional hypothesis testing versus information-theoretic or Bayesian approaches (Hobbs and Hilborn 2006). This chapter does not address these topics, but instead discusses some of the issues related to selection of study sites and species necessary to obtain a "clean result."

Keywords: sampling areas, inductive inference, clean result, study sites, species

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Corn, Paul Stephen. 2009. Selection of species and sampling areas: The importance of inference. In: Dodd, C. Kenneth, Jr., editor. Amphibian ecology and conservation: A handbook of techniques. Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press. p. 431-446.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.