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Publication Information

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Title: Evaluation of two techniques for quantification of hyphal biomass

Author: Hynes, Meagan M.; Zasoski, Robert J.; Bledsoe, Caroline S.;

Date: 2008

Source: In: Merenlender, Adina; McCreary, Douglas; Purcell, Kathryn L., tech. eds. 2008. Proceedings of the sixth California oak symposium: today's challenges, tomorrow's opportunities. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-217. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: pp. 139-148

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Currently, oak woodlands of Northern California and their associated mycorrhizal fungi are receiving more attention. In order to address the impact mycorrhizal fungal associations have on survival of various tree species in oak woodlands, we investigated the extramatrical fungal hyphae associated with several mature oak woodland tree species. Specifically our objective was to quantify the fungal hyphal biomass in soils near blue oak (Quercus douglasii), interior live oak (Quercus wislizeni), foothill pine (Pinus sabiniana), and Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa). We developed methods to determine hyphal length using microscope images with either WinRHIZO Pro 2002-3 software or the more common gridline intersect method (GIM), which calculates hyphal length using Newman’s original (1966) and modified equations (Tennant 1975). After comparing methods, we found that using microscope images in addition to Tennant’s equation resulted in the most accurate and efficient way of estimating hyphal biomass. Information gathered will be used to determine whether hyphal length is correlated with survival and growth of oaks in California’s oak woodlands.

Keywords: Blue oak, extramatrical hyphae, foothill pine, hyphal length, interior live oak, ponderosa pine

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Hynes, Meagan M.; Zasoski, Robert J.; Bledsoe, Caroline S. 2008. Evaluation of two techniques for quantification of hyphal biomass. In: Merenlender, Adina; McCreary, Douglas; Purcell, Kathryn L., tech. eds. 2008. Proceedings of the sixth California oak symposium: today's challenges, tomorrow's opportunities. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-217. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: pp. 139-148

 


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