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Title: Survivorship of raked and unraked trees through prescribed fires in conifer forests in northeastern California

Author: Laudenslayer, William F. Jr.; Steger, George N.; Arnold, Jonathan.;

Date: 2008

Source: In: Narog, Marcia G., tech. coord. 2008. Proceedings of the 2002 Fire Conference: Managing fire and fuels in the remaining wildlands and open spaces of the Southwestern United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. p. 73-82

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Large diameter, old trees are an important component of functioning forests, as they provide habitat for many wildlife species and add value to the scenery along roads and trails that cross our National Forests and Parks. Tree mortality, from prescribed or wild fire, is of great concern to forests managers, especially mortality of those of large diameter. Raking away the litter and duff around the base of these desired trees has been advocated as a way to reduce tree mortality during prescribed burns. We tested the effectiveness of raking to reduce tree mortality in two burn areas in Lassen Volcanic National Park (Lake and Lost Creek) by randomly selecting large and small diameter trees and removing the litter and duff to bare mineral soil for 1 m in radius around the base of each sample tree. The areas were prescribed burned in the fall of 1997. Results varied considerably between study plots, with 37 percent of all the sample trees (raked and unraked) in the Lake burn dying, in contrast with the Lost Creek burn where 25 percent of the sample trees died. Raked trees, however, did survive better than unraked trees in both study areas. Twenty-seven percent of the raked trees died in the Lake burn in contrast with 47 percent of the unraked trees. In the Lost Creek burn, none of the raked trees died whereas 50 percent of the unraked trees died.

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Laudenslayer Jr., William F.; Steger, George N.; Arnold, Jonathan. 2008. Survivorship of raked and unraked trees through prescribed fires in conifer forests in northeastern California. In: Narog, Marcia G., tech. coord. 2008. Proceedings of the 2002 Fire Conference: Managing fire and fuels in the remaining wildlands and open spaces of the Southwestern United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. p. 73-82

 


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