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Title: Fine root chemistry and decomposition in model communities of north-temperate tree species show little response to elevated atmospheric CO2 and varying soil resource availability

Author: King, J.S.; Pregitzer, K.S.; Zak, Donald R.; Holmes, William E.; Schmidt, K.;

Date: 2005

Source: Oecologia. 146: 318-328.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description:

Rising atmospheric [CO2] has the potential to alter soil carbon (C) cycling by increasing the content of recalcitrant constituents in plant litter, thereby decreasing rates of decomposition. Because fine root turnover constitutes a large fraction of annual NPP, changes in fine root decomposition are especially important. These responses will likely be affected by soil resource availability and the life history characteristics of the dominant tree species. We evaluated the effects of elevated atmospheric [CO2] and soil resource availability on the production and chemistry, mycorrhizal colonization, and decomposition of fine roots in an early- and late successional tree species that are economically and ecologically important in north temperate forests. Open-top chambers were used to expose young trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) and sugar maple (Acer saccharum) trees to ambient (36 Pa) and elevated (56 Pa) atmospheric CO2. Soil resource availability was composed of two treatments that bracketed the range found in the Upper Lake States, USA.

Keywords: trembling aspen, sugar maple, carbon-based secondary compounds, soil C cycling

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Citation:


King, J.S.; Pregitzer, K.S.; Zak, Donald R.; Holmes, William E.; Schmidt, K. 2005. Fine root chemistry and decomposition in model communities of north-temperate tree species show little response to elevated atmospheric CO2 and varying soil resource availability. Oecologia. 146: 318-328.

 


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