Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (38 KB)

Title: Some challenges of recognizing invasive phytophthoras and finding their origins

Author: Hansen, Everett;

Date: 2010

Source: In: Frankel, Susan J.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M. 2010. Proceedings of the Sudden Oak Death Fourth Science Symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-229. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp. 17-21

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Discovering the origins of Phytophthora ramorum remains a challenge. To improve our chances of finding the origin of P. ramorum or any other introduced organism, we need to be sure of our motivation, because success will require persistence. We need to be able to distinguish indigenous from exotic organisms, to know what to look for and recognize when we have found it, and we need a practical "search image" to guide the discovery and sorting of candidate organisms.

Perhaps the most frequently asked question about P. ramorum and sudden oak death is "Where did it come from?" Despite several expeditions to far off lands (Goheen and others 2005) and repeated searches closer to home, the answer is unchanged: “I don’t know. Maybe China.” Our ignorance is frustrating, but shouldn’t be surprising. We actually know the answer for very few pathogens. Perhaps it is timely to reexamine our approach. To improve our chances of finding the origin of P. ramorum or any other introduced organism, we need to deal with three additional questions: "How do we know it was introduced in the first place?" "Why do we need to know?" and "Where should we look and what should we be looking for?" The first is a necessary challenge to our epidemiological and genetic assumptions about invasive species of pathogenic fungi. The second is a question of motivation and commitment, and “Where to look?” is as much a question of opportunity as biology.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Hansen, Everett. 2010. Some Challenges of Recognizing Invasive Phytophthoras and Finding Their Origins. In: Frankel, Susan J.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M. 2010. Proceedings of the Sudden Oak Death Fourth Science Symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-229. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp. 17-21

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.