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Title: Summer bird/vegetation associations in Tamarisk and native habitat along the Pecos River, southeastern New Mexico

Author: Livingston, M. F.; Schemnitz, S. D.;

Date: 1996

Source: In: Shaw, Douglas W.; Finch, Deborah M., tech coords. Desired future conditions for Southwestern riparian ecosystems: Bringing interests and concerns together. 1995 Sept. 18-22, 1995; Albuquerque, NM. General Technical Report RM-GTR-272. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. p. 171-180.

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: The middle Pecos River lies in the short-grass prairie ecotype and lacked a substantial woodland community prior to tamarisk (Tamarisk chinensis) invasion. Tamarisk control is a concern for land managers on the Pecos River and other Southwestern riparian systems. Our research is part of a long term study investigating hydrological and wildlife response to tamarisk removal on the Pecos river in Eddy County, New Mexico. Our objectives were to collect baseline data and describe avian-vegetation associations at the treatment site and two non-treatment (control) sites prior to herbicide application. In 1994 and 1995, we estimated bird mean abundance and species richness in tamarisk and grassland habitats, described vegetational structure and species composition, and compared bird species abundance, richness, and composition. The treatment site and control site 1 (Brantley Wildlife Management Area [BWMA]) had expansive monotypic stands of tamarisk. Control site 2 (Bitter Lake National Wildlife Refuge [BLNWR]) had expansive areas of grassland. Bird mean abundance was significantly higher at the treatment site and BWMA in 1994 than 1995. BWMA was similar to the treatment site in vegetation, but consistently had higher bird abundance and species richness. BLNWR had minimal vegetational structure and consistently had the lowest bird abundance and species richness values. Factors including vegetation structure, grazing, habitat patchiness, and human disturbance are offered to explain differences in bird community patterns between sites.

Keywords: riparian ecosystems, human dimensions, hydrology, ecology, history, restoration

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Livingston, M. F.; Schemnitz, S. D. 1996. Summer bird/vegetation associations in Tamarisk and native habitat along the Pecos River, southeastern New Mexico. In: Shaw, Douglas W.; Finch, Deborah M., tech coords. Desired future conditions for Southwestern riparian ecosystems: Bringing interests and concerns together. 1995 Sept. 18-22, 1995; Albuquerque, NM. General Technical Report RM-GTR-272. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. p. 171-180.

 


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