Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (65 KB)

Title: Applications for predicting precipitation and vegetation patterns at landscape scale using lightning strike data

Author: Potter, Deborah Ulinski;

Date: 1999

Source: In: Finch, Deborah M.; Whitney, Jeffrey C.; Kelly, Jeffrey, F.; Loftin, Samuel R. Rio Grande ecosystems: linking land, water, and people: Toward a sustainable future for the Middle Rio Grande Basin. 1998 June 2-5; Albuquerque, NM. Proc. RMRS-P-7. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 112-115.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Previous publications discussed the results of my dissertation research on relationships between seasonality in precipitation and vegetation patterns at landscape scale. Summer precipitation at a study site in the Zuni Mountains, NM, was predicted from lightning strike and relative humidity data using multiple regression. Summer precipitation patterns were mapped using a Geographic Information System (GIS). Winter precipitation and vegetative cover were obtained from the Terrestrial Ecosystem Survey (TES). Finally, winter and summer precipitation amounts and their percent of annual precipitation were compared to grass and tree cover. Results indicated that winter precipitation influenced tree cover. Grass cover dominated by Bouteloua gracilis was most closely related to summer precipitation. Grass cover dominated by Festuca arizonica was most closely related to winter precipitation. This manuscript presents a synthesis of the dissertation research. It discusses how land managers can use lightning strike data and TES information. Ecosystem management applications for predicting precipitation and vegetation patterns at landscape scale are explored. For example, vegetation regeneration may be more successful if precipitation patterns are known. Understanding relationships between vegetation and precipitation patterns can also be used to assess the behavior of fire and for restoring disturbed areas. Additional research at landscape scale could improve our understanding of potential changes in vegetation patterns due to climatic warming.

Keywords: Rio Grande Basin, conservation, watershed, endangered species, sensitive species, restoration

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Potter, Deborah Ulinski. 1999. Applications for predicting precipitation and vegetation patterns at landscape scale using lightning strike data. In: Finch, Deborah M.; Whitney, Jeffrey C.; Kelly, Jeffrey, F.; Loftin, Samuel R. Rio Grande ecosystems: linking land, water, and people: Toward a sustainable future for the Middle Rio Grande Basin. 1998 June 2-5; Albuquerque, NM. Proc. RMRS-P-7. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 112-115.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.