Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (2.2 MB)

Title: River bar vegetation mowing response in the Middle Rio Grande

Author: Muldavin, Esteban; Milford, Elizabeth; Chauvin, Yvonne;

Date: 1999

Source: In: Finch, Deborah M.; Whitney, Jeffrey C.; Kelly, Jeffrey, F.; Loftin, Samuel R. Rio Grande ecosystems: linking land, water, and people: Toward a sustainable future for the Middle Rio Grande Basin. 1998 June 2-5; Albuquerque, NM. Proc. RMRS-P-7. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 139-150.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: The Bureau of Reclamation routinely mows vegetation on side bars along the Rio Grande to assist with river flow management. To address the question of how such mowing affects vegetation composition and structure, three bars in the middle Rio Grande near Albuquerque, New Mexico were selected in 1994 for an experimental mowing program. Three 50-foot-wide strips on each bar were left unmowed, with the area between the strips mowed as usual. This mowing pattern was repeated in 1995 and 1996. In August 1996, vegetation composition, abundance and structure were measured under the two conditions of the treated bars and at one additional bar with no history of mowing. Species composition and abundance were compared among sites and treatments using ANOVAs and canonical discriminant analysis. The greatest negative effect was on the native cottonwood where there were significant declines of 70-90 percent on some sites with respect to cover, stems and individuals. Mowing also reduces the exotic Russian olive cover by 50-70 percent on sites where it is dominant. Although cover may decline, Russian olive often responds by resprouting and creating vigorous multiple-stemmed individuals. Coyote willow was affected less by mowing; at the site with the most willow cover (Belen), declines in both cover and the number of individuals were only about 32 percent. This relatively higher mowing tolerance may reflective coyote willow's greater adaptativeness to natural disturbances such as flooding. What is clear however, is that regardless of what shrubs are dominant, cottonwood is always the most negatively affected by mowing.

Keywords: Rio Grande Basin, conservation, watershed, endangered species, sensitive species, restoration

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Muldavin, Esteban; Milford, Elizabeth; Chauvin, Yvonne. 1999. River bar vegetation mowing response in the Middle Rio Grande. In: Finch, Deborah M.; Whitney, Jeffrey C.; Kelly, Jeffrey, F.; Loftin, Samuel R. Rio Grande ecosystems: linking land, water, and people: Toward a sustainable future for the Middle Rio Grande Basin. 1998 June 2-5; Albuquerque, NM. Proc. RMRS-P-7. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 139-150.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.