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Title: Influence of mycorrhizal source and seeding methods on native grass species grown in soils from a disturbed site

Author: Caplan, Todd R.; Pratt, Heather A.; Loftin, Samuel R.;

Date: 1999

Source: In: Finch, Deborah M.; Whitney, Jeffrey C.; Kelly, Jeffrey, F.; Loftin, Samuel R. Rio Grande ecosystems: linking land, water, and people: Toward a sustainable future for the Middle Rio Grande Basin. 1998 June 2-5; Albuquerque, NM. Proc. RMRS-P-7. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 170-174.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Mycorrhizal fungi are crucial elements in native plant communities and restoring these fungi to disturbed sites is known to improve revegetation success. We tested the seedball method of plant dispersal for restoration of plants and mycorrhizal fungi to disturbed ecosystems. We tested the seedball method with a native mycorrhizal fungi inoculum, and a commercial inoculum. We found that the native culture and commercial inoculum were not viable sources of mycorrhizae.

Keywords: Rio Grande Basin, conservation, watershed, endangered species, sensitive species, restoration

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Caplan, Todd R.; Pratt, Heather A.; Loftin, Samuel R. 1999. Influence of mycorrhizal source and seeding methods on native grass species grown in soils from a disturbed site. In: Finch, Deborah M.; Whitney, Jeffrey C.; Kelly, Jeffrey, F.; Loftin, Samuel R. Rio Grande ecosystems: linking land, water, and people: Toward a sustainable future for the Middle Rio Grande Basin. 1998 June 2-5; Albuquerque, NM. Proc. RMRS-P-7. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 170-174.

 


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