Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (94 KB)

Title: Spread of a nonnative grass across southern Arizona: Multiple data sources to monitor change

Author: Geiger, Erika; Mau-Crimmins, Theresa; Schussman, Heather;

Date: 2003

Source: In: McClaran, Mitchel P.; Ffolliott, Peter F.; Edminster, Carleton B., tech. coords. Santa Rita Experimental Range: 100 years (1903 to 2003) of accomplishments and contributions; conference proceedings; 2003 October 30-November 1; Tucson, AZ. Proc. RMRS-P-30. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 116-120.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: In 1934, Eragrostis lehmanniana was introduced into southeastern Arizona to control erosion and provide forage for cattle. The earliest of these introductions took place on the Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER) in 1937 and continued there until the early 1960s. Numerous researchers have observed a convincing association between an increased proportion of E. lehmanniana and decreasing species richness in these grasslands. This grass is both invasive and persistent: just 50 years after its introduction, the area occupied by E. lehmanniana had doubled. Published evidence indicates that variables such as elevation, summer precipitation, winter temperatures, and soils impact its abundance and distribution. We used these variables to generate a map of current predicted distribution of E. lehmanniana. Using over 600 presence/absence points amassed from eight agencies in Arizona, we selected among the guidelines to create a current distribution map for E. lehmanniana in Arizona. We then modified this map using two common general circulation models developed by the Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research and the Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis to predict the potential distribution of E. lehmanniana in Arizona in the year 2030.

Keywords: long-term research, livestock grazing, vegetation, soils, erosion, cultural resources

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Geiger, Erika; Mau-Crimmins, Theresa; Schussman, Heather. 2003. Spread of a nonnative grass across southern Arizona: Multiple data sources to monitor change. In: McClaran, Mitchel P.; Ffolliott, Peter F.; Edminster, Carleton B., tech. coords. Santa Rita Experimental Range: 100 years (1903 to 2003) of accomplishments and contributions; conference proceedings; 2003 October 30-November 1; Tucson, AZ. Proc. RMRS-P-30. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 116-120.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.