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Title: Efficacy of commercial algaecides to manage species of Phytophthora in suburban waterways

Author: Colburn, G. Curtis; Jeffers, Steven N.;

Date: 2010

Source: In: Frankel, Susan J.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M. 2010. Proceedings of the Sudden Oak Death Fourth Science Symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-229. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp. 223-224

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Many commercial algaecides contain copper compounds as active ingredients. Phytophthora spp. and other oomycetes are known to be sensitive to copper-based fungicides. Therefore, algaecides registered to manage algae in natural waterways and irrigation waters also might be effective for mitigating or even eradicating Phytophthora species, including P. ramorum, in these same waterways. Many of the commercially available algaecides are registered for use in diverse natural and agricultural water environments, and water treated with these products may be used for swimming, fishing, watering livestock, and irrigating turf and ornamental plants immediately after treatment. Consequently, these algaecides appear to be relatively safe for both humans and the environment. Experiments in our laboratory have demonstrated that two algaecides with copper-based active ingredients were toxic to zoospores, sporangia, and chlamydospores of P. ramorum and to zoospores of six other species of Phytophthora.

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Colburn, G. Curtis; Jeffers, Steven N. 2010. Efficacy of commercial algaecides to manage species of Phytophthora in suburban waterways. In: Frankel, Susan J.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M. 2010. Proceedings of the Sudden Oak Death Fourth Science Symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-229. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp. 223-224

 


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