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Title: Regeneration in windthrow areas in hemiboreal forests: the influence of microsite on the height growths of different tree species

Author: Vodde, F.; Jõgiste, K.; Gruson, L.; Ilisson, T.; Köster, K.; Stanturf, J.A.;

Date: 2010

Source: Journal of Forest Research 15:55–64

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: Natural regeneration of windthrow areas is an important issue when planning forestry measures after forest disturbances. Seedling recruitment was investigated in storm-damaged hemiboreal mixed forests in eastern Estonia. The establishment and growth of seedlings from natural regeneration was registered for tree species in soil pits and in mounds of uprooted trees in stands that were either heavily or moderately damaged. Seedling growth is expected to be better in large but shallow soil pits created by uprooted Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] and poorer in small but deep pits created by the hardwoods in the area, silver birch (Betula pendula Roth.) and European aspen (Populus tremula L.). The most abundant regenerating species was birch. Pits hosted larger seedling numbers than mounds, due to soil instability in mounds. Rowan (Sorbus aucuparia L.) showed significantly faster growth than the other seedling species. Norway spruce pits were preferred to pits of other species by both birch and spruce seedlings. Black alder [Alnus glutinosa (L.) J. Gaertn.] did not show a preference for pits of a certain species of uprooted tree. Both spruce and rowan preferred hardwood mounds over spruce mounds. Storm severity also affected species composition: birch predominantly occurred on pits and mounds in heavily disturbed areas, while spruce was more abundant in the moderately damaged areas. The effects of advance regeneration and surrounding stands on seedling microsite preferences should be considered in future research and subsequent management recommendations.

Keywords: Microsite, Norway spruce, Regeneration, Silver birch, Wind disturbance

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Vodde, F.; Jõgiste, K.; Gruson, L.; Ilisson, T.; Köster, K.; Stanturf, J.A. 2010. Regeneration in windthrow areas in hemiboreal forests: the influence of microsite on the height growths of different tree species. Journal of Forest Research 15:55–64.

 


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