Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (1.0 MB byte)

Title: The structure of the herpetofaunal assemblage in the Douglas-fir/hardwood forests of northwestern California and southwestern Oregon

Author: Welsh, Hart Jr.; Lind, A.J.;

Date: 1991

Source: Pages 394-413 in: Ruggerio, L.F.; Aubry, K.B.; Carey, A.B.; Huff, M., tech. corrds., Wildlife and Vegetation of Unmanaged Douglas-fir Forests. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-285

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

Description: Terrestrial and aquatic herpetofauna were sampled by three methods, time-constrained searches, pitfall traps, and areaconstrained searches from 1984 to 1986 in northwestern California and southwestern Oregon. The 54 terrestrial and 39 aquatic study sites were in Douglas-fir/hardwood forest stands that ranged in age from 30 to 560 years. Results of these surveys are presented in terms of species richness, equitability, relative abundance, relative biomass, and macrohabitat and microhabitat associations.

Although species richness did not differ among forest ageclasses, the composition of the herpetofauna was notably different. Old and wet sites had proportionately more amphibian species, and young and dry sites had proportionately more reptile species. Terrestrial salamanders were more abundant on old-growth than on young sites. We also found that structural components associated with older forests were the best predictors of increased numbers of salamanders. Analyses of microhabitat associations indicated that large, welldecayed logs were the most heavily used woody debris, though use of particular size- and decay-classes varied among salamander species.

Harvesting forests without immediately affecting herpetofauna is probably not possible; however, strategies can be developed to minimize long-term adverse effects. We provide a summary of management recommendations designed to assure long-term viablity of herpetofauna in areas subject to logging.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Welsh, Hartwell H., Jr.; Lind, A.J. 1991. The structure of the herpetofaunal assemblage in the Douglas-fir/hardwood forests of northwestern California and southwestern Oregon. Pages 394-413 in: Ruggerio, L.F.; Aubry, K.B.; Carey, A.B.; Huff, M., tech. corrds., Wildlife and Vegetation of Unmanaged Douglas-fir Forests. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-285

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.