Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (682 KB)

Title: Relationships between forest songbird populations and managed forests in Idaho

Author: Evans, Diane M.; Finch, Deborah M.;

Date: 1994

Source: In: Covington, W. Wallace; DeBano, Leonard F.; tech, coords. Sustainable ecological systems: implementing an ecological approach to land management. 1993 July 12-15; Flagstaff, Arizona. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-247. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. p. 308-314.

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Many species of songbirds have experienced population declines. In the eastern U.S. in recent years, but conclusive data on population trends and factors affecting populations in the West are lacking. Few studies have evaluated the importance of surrounding land configuration to songbird abundances. In 1992, we initiated a study in mixed conifer forest in west-central Idaho to compare songbird composition and abundances among two untreated watersheds and three watersheds having clearcuts. Watersheds were selected on the basis of their la-rge size, accessibility, dominant tree type, and timing and extent of management. Based on 1992 point counts of 29 selected bird species, we identified four species that had significantly lower mean birds/count station in managed study areas than in untreated areas. These were hermit thrush (Catharus guttatus), Swainson's thrush (Catharus ustulatus), pileated woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus), and warbling vireo (Vireo gilvus). Twelve species were significantly more abundant in clearcut watersheds than in untreated watersheds, whereas abundances of 13 species did not differ between treated and untreated study areas. Variation in bird species richness among study areas may have been influenced by sampling intensity. Negative or positive responses to management were not clearly associated with migratory status. We discuss 1993 modifications to our study design and future use of a Geographic Information System (GIS) to measure landscape characteristics.

Keywords: sustainable ecological systems, ecosystem management, use, biology, conservation, restoration, ecology, sustainable ecosystems and forest health

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Evans, Diane M.; Finch, Deborah M. 1994. Relationships between forest songbird populations and managed forests in Idaho. In: Covington, W. Wallace; DeBano, Leonard F.; tech, coords. Sustainable ecological systems: implementing an ecological approach to land management. 1993 July 12-15; Flagstaff, Arizona. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-247. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. p. 308-314.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.