Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (387 KB)

Title: Mercury cycling in peatland watersheds. Chapter 11.

Author: Kolka, Randall K.; Mitchell, Carl P.J.; Jeremiason, Jeffrey D.; Hines, Neal A.; Grigal, David F.; Engstrom, Daniel R.; Coleman-Wasik, Jill K.; Nater, Edward A.; Swain, Edward B.; Monson, Bruce A.; Fleck, Jacob A.; Johnson, Brian; Almendinger, James E.; Branfireun, Brian A.; Brezonik, Patrick L.; Cotner, James B.;

Date: 2011

Source: In: Kolka, Randall K.; Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Verry, Elon S.; Brooks,Kenneth N., eds. Peatland biogeochemistry and watershed hydrology at the Marcell Experimental Forest. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press: 349-370.

Publication Series: Book Chapter

Description: Mercury (Hg) is of great environmental concern due to its transformation into the toxic methylmercury (MeHg) form that bioaccumulates within the food chain and causes health concerns for both humans and wildlife (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 2002). Mercury can affect neurological development in fetuses and young children. In adults, exposure to Hg can lead to the deterioration of the nervous system, decreased sensory abilities, and a lack of muscle control (Ratcliffe et al. 1996). Methylmercury in fish poses a severe health risk for fish-eating animals such as otter, mink, bald eagle, kingfisher, osprey, and the common loon (Walcek et al. 2003), and even for fish themselves (Sand heinrich and Miller 2006). In the mid-1990s, studies at the USDA Forest Service's Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF) began to measure the transport of Hg through the terrestrial environment (Kolka et al. 1999a,b, 2001). These studies assessed the mechanisms responsible for the deposition of Hg (including that in litterfall) and the uptake of Hg by trees (Fleck et al. 1999).

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • This publication may be available in hard copy. Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
  • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Kolka, Randall K.; Mitchell, Carl P.J.; Jeremiason, Jeffrey D.; Hines, Neal A.; Grigal, David F.; Engstrom, Daniel R.; Coleman-Wasik, Jill K.; Nater, Edward A.; Swain,Edward B.; Monson, Bruce A.; Fleck, Jacob A.; Johnson, Brian; Almendinger, James E.; Branfireun, Brian A.; Brezonik, Patrick L.; Cotner, James B. 2011. Mercury cycling in peatland watersheds. In: Kolka, Randall K.; Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Verry, Elon S.; Brooks,Kenneth N., eds. Peatland biogeochemistry and watershed hydrology at the Marcell Experimental Forest. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press: 349-370.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.