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Title: Maximizing carbon storage in the Appalachians: A method for considering the risk of disturbance events

Author: Vanderberg, Michael R.; Boston, Kevin; Bailey, John.;

Date: 2011

Source: In: Fei, Songlin; Lhotka, John M.; Stringer, Jeffrey W.; Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Miller, Gary W., eds. Proceedings, 17th central hardwood forest conference; 2010 April 5-7; Lexington, KY; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-78. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 134-142.

Publication Series: General Technical Report - Proceedings

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Accounting for the probability of loss due to disturbance events can influence the prediction of carbon flux over a planning horizon, and can affect the determination of optimal silvicultural regimes to maximize terrestrial carbon storage. A preliminary model that includes forest disturbance-related carbon loss was developed to maximize expected values of carbon stocks. Stand-level optimization was used to develop silvicultural regimes that present a range of forest management benefits, while maximizing expected carbon stocks in the process. Potential benefits include: (1) a reduction in the risk of carbon loss due to disturbance events; (2) increased carbon storage; and (3) the offset of treatment costs through the utilization of treatment-generated woody material. This methodology may also provide a baseline for a full accounting of forestry carbon offset projects. The ability to increase terrestrial carbon density can be limited with the occurrence of disturbance events, as exhibited by some Appalachian forest types. However, silvicultural regimes maximized the expected value of in-forest carbon and carbon in wood products over the life of the analysis period in other Appalachian forest types. The results of this analysis suggest that treatments that effectively manipulate structure, age, and composition have the greatest potential for maximizing terrestrial carbon stocks by simultaneously considering both the risk of emission and storage potential.

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Citation:


Vanderberg, Michael R.; Boston, Kevin; Bailey, John. 2011. Maximizing carbon storage in the Appalachians: A method for considering the risk of disturbance events. In: Fei, Songlin; Lhotka, John M.; Stringer, Jeffrey W.; Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Miller, Gary W., eds. Proceedings, 17th central hardwood forest conference; 2010 April 5-7; Lexington, KY; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-78. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 134-142.

 


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