Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (250 KB)

Title: The fate of nitrogen mineralized from leaf litter — Initial evidence from 15N-labeled litter

Author: Piatek, Kathryn B.;

Date: 2011

Source: In: Fei, Songlin; Lhotka, John M.; Stringer, Jeffrey W.; Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Miller, Gary W., eds. Proceedings, 17th central hardwood forest conference; 2010 April 5-7; Lexington, KY; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-78. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 164-176.

Publication Series: General Technical Report - Proceedings

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Decomposition of leaf litter includes microbial immobilization of nitrogen (N), followed by N mineralization. The fate of N mineralized from leaf litter is unknown. I hypothesized that N mineralized from leaf litter will be re-immobilized into other forms of organic matter, including downed wood. This mechanism may retain N in some forests. To test this hypothesis, oak leaves were enriched with a naturally occurring, stable isotope of N (15N), collected as litter, and allowed to decompose with and without wood (10 cm long, in 3 diameter classes of < 2 cm, 2-4 cm, and 4-6 cm) in litter bags in the forest floor of a central hardwood forest near Morgantown, WV. As oak litter immobilized exogenous N, 15N in litter decreased due to dilution, and then did not change significantly. Nitrogen mineralization in leaf litter did not start for at least 24 months. By the 11th month of decomposition, wood N reached between 140 and 274 percent of the initial N mass, depending on wood diameter. By the 24th month, 15N was detected in wood, supporting the hypothesis. Nitrogen-label was not detected in fresh litter above litter bags, or below litter bags in partly decomposed forest floor or soil. It appears that N mineralized from leaf litter may be transferred to and immobilized in small-diameter downed wood. If these results are confirmed in a larger study, we may need to change the way we view N cycling in the leaf litter layer; N mineralized from foliar litter may not be immediately plant-available as we now assume.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • This publication may be available in hard copy. Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
  • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Piatek, Kathryn B. 2011. The fate of nitrogen mineralized from leaf litter — Initial evidence from 15N-labeled litter. In: Fei, Songlin; Lhotka, John M.; Stringer, Jeffrey W.; Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Miller, Gary W., eds. Proceedings, 17th central hardwood forest conference; 2010 April 5-7; Lexington, KY; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-78. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 164-176.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.