Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (80 KB)

Title: Effects of midstory removal on underplanted black oak and white oak in the western Cumberland Plateau

Author: Parrott, David L.; Lhotka, John M.; Stringer, Jeffrey W.;

Date: 2011

Source: In: Fei, Songlin; Lhotka, John M.; Stringer, Jeffrey W.; Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Miller, Gary W., eds. Proceedings, 17th central hardwood forest conference; 2010 April 5-7; Lexington, KY; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-78. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 270-276.

Publication Series: General Technical Report - Proceedings

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Difficulties in successful oak regeneration have led to the examination of various techniques to increase oak recruitment. To ensure sufficient regeneration, oak seedlings can be underplanted and used in conjunction with intermediate treatments, such as midstory removal, that create a light environment favorable to oak advance reproduction. This study examines the 5-year response of underplanted white oak (Quercus alba L.) and black oak (Quercus velutina L.) seedlings to a midstory removal on intermediate sites within the western edge of the Cumberland Plateau. Three sites were established and split to provide an area where the midstory remained intact and an area where the midstory was removed. At each site, white and black oak 1-0 bareroot seedlings were underplanted. Midstory removal treatments removed 13 to 19 percent of the basal area in treated units. Seedling height, ground line diameter, and survival status were measured at the time of treatment implementation (spring 2004) and after five growing seasons. Fifth-year survival of white and black oaks under an intact midstory was 51 and 14 percent, respectively. Under removed midstories, white oak survival averaged 81 percent while black oak averaged 32 percent. Midstory removal increased diameter growth for both underplanted white and black oaks. Treatments did not affect seedling height growth of either species. The ground line diameter growth response is consistent with known patterns of oak carbon allocation favoring development of root systems prior to height growth, indicating increased aboveground growth potential.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • This publication may be available in hard copy. Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
  • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Parrott, David L.; Lhotka, John M.; Stringer, Jeffrey W. 2011. Effects of midstory removal on underplanted black oak and white oak in the western Cumberland Plateau. In: Fei, Songlin; Lhotka, John M.; Stringer, Jeffrey W.; Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Miller, Gary W., eds. Proceedings, 17th central hardwood forest conference; 2010 April 5-7; Lexington, KY; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-78. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 270-276.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.