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Title: A cost comparison of five midstory removal methods

Author: Bailey, Brian G.; Saunders, Michael R.; Lowe, Zachary E.;

Date: 2011

Source: In: Fei, Songlin; Lhotka, John M.; Stringer, Jeffrey W.; Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Miller, Gary W., eds. Proceedings, 17th central hardwood forest conference; 2010 April 5-7; Lexington, KY; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-78. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 535-543.

Publication Series: General Technical Report - Proceedings

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Within mature hardwood forests, midstory removal treatments have been shown to provide the adequate light and growing space needed for early establishment of intermediate-shade-tolerant species. As the method gains popularity, it is worthwhile to determine what manner of removal is most cost-efficient. Th is study compared five midstory removal treatments across 10 acres on two sites in Indiana. The treatments were: manual (chainsaws and brush saws), mechanical (tree mower), herbicide (15-percent triclopyr and 3-percent imazapyr), mechanical plus herbicide, and manual plus herbicide. Financial inputs, consisting of labor hours, equipment maintenance, and material costs, were closely documented. The removal increased light to a mean of 15 percent of an open canopy, and basal area was reduced by 20 ft2 ac-1. Large equipment was shown to be very costly relative to its efficacy, and could not be recommended unless an individual either has access to less expensive equipment or is working with unusually large and easily accessible stands. In terms of basal area and stems removed, chainsaws and brush saws were more economical and more effi cient than the other four treatments.

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Citation:


Bailey, Brian G.; Saunders, Michael R.; Lowe, Zachary E. 2011. A cost comparison of five midstory removal methods. In: Fei, Songlin; Lhotka, John M.; Stringer, Jeffrey W.; Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Miller, Gary W., eds. Proceedings, 17th central hardwood forest conference; 2010 April 5-7; Lexington, KY; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-78. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 535-543.

 


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