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Title: Influence of fire on mycorrhizal colonization of planted and natural whitebark pine seedlings: Ecology and management implications

Author: Trusty, Paul E.; Cripps, Cathy L.;

Date: 2011

Source: In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 198-202.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is a threatened keystone species in subalpine zones of Western North America that plays a role in watershed dynamics and maintenance of high elevation biodiversity (Schwandt, 2006). Whitebark pine has experienced significant mortality due to white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetle outbreaks and successional replacement possibly due to fire suppression (Schwandt 2006; Smith and others 2008). Current management strategies include letting lightning fires burn or applying prescribed fire to provide habitat for natural seedling establishment or the planting of rust resistant seedlings (Keane and Parsons 2010a, 2010b). However survival rates after fire are variable and can be low (Izlar 2007; Keane and Parsons 2010a; Perkins 2004; Tomback and others 2001).

Keywords: high elevation five-needle pines, threats, whitebark, Pinus albicaulis, limber, Pinus flexilis, southwestern white, Pinus strobiformis, foxtail, Pinus balfouriana, Great Basin bristlecone, Pinus longaeva, Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine, Pinus aristata

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Trusty, Paul E.; Cripps, Cathy L. 2011. Influence of fire on mycorrhizal colonization of planted and natural whitebark pine seedlings: Ecology and management implications. In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 198-202.

 


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