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Title: From dominance to detente in the face of climate change: Agreements beyond boundaries with indigenous nations

Author: Stumpff, Linda Moon;

Date: 2011

Source: In: Watson, Alan; Murrieta-Saldivar, Joaquin; McBride, Brooke, comps. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Ninth World Wilderness Congress symposium; November 6-13, 2009; Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. Proceedings RMRS-P-64. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 34-38.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: This paper explores frameworks for expanding agreements between indigenous peoples, governments, and partner organizations to conserve and restore wild and protected areas impacted by climate change. From the Indigenous Peoples Treaty Project to the expansion of Federal nation to nation consultation with Tribes in the United States, new initiatives create models for reducing conflict in relationships formerly based on dominance. Impacts of climate change already "in the pipeline" call for shared participatory processes where traditional ecological knowledge and community participation form key components. Responses to climate change like natural or assisted migrations or reallocation of natural water flows illustrate the proclivity of climate change to break through borders. Impacts to indigenous communities, now an international issue, add to the need for careful examination of intergovernmental and international agreements. Water, above all else, suggests that cooperation and détente must replace domination to achieve trans-boundary goals protecting wildlands, biological corridors, waterways, and people. Détente is a balancing bar for traditional ecological knowledge, rights, and relationships that expand the reach of action to resolve problems. Innovation in bilateral and multilateral relationships harmonizes conflicts by building the foundations for agreements. Consultation between indigenous peoples, governments, and organizations protecting wildlands creates harmonizing mechanisms for inclusive multilateral relations and strategic planning. Rebalancing power relationships and combining authorities, vital to combat fragmented policy, ensures the survival of wildlands and indigenous peoples.

Keywords: wilderness, biodiversity, conservation, protected areas, economics, subsistence, tourism, traditional knowledge, community involvement, policy, stewardship, education, spiritual values, indigenous nations, climate change

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Stumpff, Linda Moon. 2011. From dominance to detente in the face of climate change: Agreements beyond boundaries with indigenous nations. In: Watson, Alan; Murrieta-Saldivar, Joaquin; McBride, Brooke, comps. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Ninth World Wilderness Congress symposium; November 6-13, 2009; Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. Proceedings RMRS-P-64. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 34-38.

 


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