Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (165 KB)

Title: Protection of the wilderness and aesthetic values of Antarctica: Geographical Information Systems (GIS) as a tool

Author: Summerson, Rupert; Tin, Tina;

Date: 2011

Source: In: Watson, Alan; Murrieta-Saldivar, Joaquin; McBride, Brooke, comps. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Ninth World Wilderness Congress symposium; November 6-13, 2009; Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. Proceedings RMRS-P-64. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 178-181.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Antarctica is designated by the Antarctic Treaty System as a "natural reserve devoted to peace and science" (http://www.ats.aq/index_e.htm). Multiple, and sometimes conflicting, values are protected. In a place where wilderness protection and certain forms of human activity are both prized, a discussion of the protection of the Antarctic wilderness necessarily leads to the question of the present and future human footprint in Antarctica. A comprehensive and systematic assessment of the human footprint in Antarctica has never been done, and in this paper the authors explore the opportunities and challenges in conducting such an assessment. On examining the exchange of information conducted under the Antarctic Treaty System, one finds that the information on human activity in Antarctica is relatively centralized, and that with the right permissions, together with dedicated and significant effort, it should be possible to assemble all information in one place. After that, the next challenge lies in the representation of this data in a coherent manner that would be useful for planning purposes. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) are a useful tool for representing this data; however, much work still needs to be done to arrive at a system that is clear, transparent, and reproducible and can illustrate the impacts of human activities on wilderness character or values.

Keywords: wilderness, biodiversity, conservation, protected areas, economics, subsistence, tourism, traditional knowledge, community involvement, policy, stewardship, education, spiritual values, Antarctica, Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Summerson, Rupert; Tin, Tina. 2011. Protection of the wilderness and aesthetic values of Antarctica: Geographical Information Systems (GIS) as a tool. In: Watson, Alan; Murrieta-Saldivar, Joaquin; McBride, Brooke, comps. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Ninth World Wilderness Congress symposium; November 6-13, 2009; Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. Proceedings RMRS-P-64. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 178-181.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.