Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (740 KB)

Title: Allometry, biomass, and chemical content of novel African Tulip Tree (Spathodea campanulata) forests in Puerto Rico

Author: Lugo, Ariel E.; Abelleira, Oscar J.; Collado, Alexander; Viera, Christian A.; Santiago, Cynthia; Velez, Diego O.; Soto, Emilio; Amaro, Giovanni; Charon, Graciela; Colon, Jr. Hector; Santana, Jennifer; Morales, Jose L.; Rivera, Katherine; Ortiz, Luis; Rivera, Luis; Maldonado, Mianel; Rivera, Natalia; Vazquez, Norelis J.;

Date: 2011

Source: New Forests. DOI 10.1007/s11056-011-9258-8

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: The African tulip tree, Spathodea campanulata, the most common tree in Puerto Rico, forms novel forest types with mixtures of native and other introduced tree species. Novel forests increase in area in response to human activity and there is no information about their biomass accumulation and nutrient cycling. We established allometric relationships and chemically analyzed plant parts of African tulip trees to determine the concentration and standing stock of chemical elements (C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Mn, Al, Fe, Na), and ash. Trees ranged in diameter at breast height from 8 to 85 cm and in height from 8.8 to 28 m. The concentrations of N, P, K, and Ca in leaves of the African tulip tree were similar to those of the native pioneer Cecropia schreberiana and higher than those of mature forest tree species in Puerto Rico. The over bark wood volume of African tulip trees in nine forest stands where it was dominant ranged from 163 to 849 m3/ha. Aboveground biomass ranged from 60 to 296 Mg/ha, and N and P stocks ranged from 190 to 988 and 32 to 137 kg/ha, respectively. Novel forests on abandoned agricultural lands can store more biomass and elements than native and plantation forest stands of similar age.

Keywords: Nutrient concentration, Nutrient cycling, Stemwood volume , Biomass, Carbon, Introduced species, Puerto Rico, Secondary forests, Novel forests

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Lugo, Ariel E.; Abelleira, Oscar J.; Collado, Alexander; Viera, Christian A.; Santiago, Cynthia; Velez, Diego O.; Soto, Emilio; Amaro, Giovanni; Charon, Graciela; Colon, Jr., Hector; Santana, Jennifer; Morales, Jose L.; Rivera, Katherine; Ortiz, Luis; Rivera, Luis; Maldonado, Mianel; Rivera, Natalia; Vazquez, Norelis J. 2011. Allometry, biomass, and chemical content of novel African Tulip Tree (Spathodea campanulata) forests in Puerto Rico. New Forests. DOI 10.1007/s11056-011-9258-8

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.