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Title: Earth, wind, and fire: Abiotic factors and the impacts of global environmental change on forest health

Author: Lundquist, J.E.; Camp, A.E.; Tyrell, M.L.; Seybold, S.J.; Cannon, P.; Lodge, D.J.;

Date: 2011

Source: Ch. 7, in Castello, J.D., and Teale, S.A. (eds.). Forest Health: An Integrated Perspective. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, pp. 195-243

Publication Series: Book

Description: Trees do not just die; there is always a primary cause, and often contributing factors. Trees need adequate quantities of water, heat, light, nutrients, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and other abiotic resources to sustain life, growth, and reproduction. When these factors are deficient or excessive, they cause mortality. According to the concept of baseline mortality (Chapters 1, 2, and 3), a certain number of trees must die as a forest ages to maintain a healthy condition. Abiotic factors kill trees in different ways, e.g., starvation, desiccation, uprooting, or stem breakage. The patterns of mortality and how the forest responds determine how changing stand structures impact sustainability and productivity. Here, we discuss abiotic factors, and how they influence diameter and age class distributions. We conclude this chapter by suggesting general principles about the impacts of abiotic disturbances on stand structures within forest ecosystems.

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Lundquist, J.E.; Camp, A.E.; Tyrell, M.L.; Seybold, S.J.; Cannon, P.; Lodge, D.J. 2011. Earth, wind, and fire: Abiotic factors and the impacts of global environmental change on forest health. Ch. 7, in Castello, J.D., and Teale, S.A. (eds.). Forest Health: An Integrated Perspective. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, pp. 195-243

 


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