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Title: What risk do invasive bark beetles and woodborers pose to forests of the western U.S.?: A case study of the Mediterranean pine engraver, Orthotomicus erosus

Author: Seybold, S.J.; Downing, M.;

Date: 2009

Source: In: Hayes, J.L.; Lundquist, J.E., comps 2009. The Western Bark Beetle Research Group: a unique collaboration with Forest Health Protection-proceedings of a symposium at the 2007 Society of American Foresters conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-784. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station: 111-134

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Recently reported, and likely to threaten the health of standing trees in the urban and peri-urban forests of the West, are at least five new subcortical insect/pathogen complexes [Agrilus coxalis Waterhouse (Buprestidae) and four species of Scolytidae: Orthotomicus (Ips) erosus (Wollaston), Hylurgus lignipderda F., Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov, and Pityophthorus juglandis Blackman, which vectors the invasive fungus, Geosmithia sp.]. Through the Forest Insect and Disease Leaflet and Pest Alert series and other extension-type publications, personnel from USDA Forest Service Research and Development (R&D) have worked closely with USDA Forest Service Forest Health Protection (FHP) specialists in the western regions to disseminate information to the public on the distribution, identification, biology, and potential impact of these new pests to western U.S. forests. Because the Mediterranean pine engraver, O. erosus, has the most potential to have a strong impact on conifers in western U.S. forests and elsewhere in North America, we focus on this species as a case study for the development of a species-specific national risk map (=Potential Susceptibility map) to illustrate how USDA Forest Service R&D and USDA Forest Service FHP [in this case the Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team (FHTET)], can work cooperatively to address an issue of pressing national concern.

Keywords: Aleppo pine, bark beetles, invasive insect species, Italian stone pine, riskmapping

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Citation:


Seybold, S.J.; Downing, M. 2009. What risk do invasive bark beetles and woodborers pose to forests of the western U.S.?: A case study of the Mediterranean pine engraver, Orthotomicus erosus. In: Hayes, J.L.; Lundquist, J.E., comps 2009. The Western Bark Beetle Research Group: a unique collaboration with Forest Health Protection-proceedings of a symposium at the 2007 Society of American Foresters conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-784. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station: 111-134.

 


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