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Title: Effects of fire on intangible cultural resources: Moving toward a landscape approach [Chapter 8]

Author: Welch, John R.;

Date: 2012

Source: cultural resources, heritage resources, archaeology, fire regime, fire environment, fuels management, fire management, fire planning, wildfire, prescribed fire, First-Order fire effects, Second-Order fire effects, Third-Order fire effects, Burned Area Emergency Rehabilitation (BAER), fire severity, traditional cultural knowledge (TKE), cultural landscapes Publication: In: Ryan, Kevin C.; Jones, Ann Trinkle; Koerner, Cassandra L.; Lee, Kristine M., tech. eds. Wildland fire in ecosystems: effect

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Long before the Secretaries of the Departments of Agriculture and Interior signed the Federal Wildland Fire Management Policy in 1995, most land and resource professionals in the United States had recognized unprecedented fuel accumulations in western forests as management priorities. The Policy, its 2001 revision, the 2003 Healthy Forests Restoration Act, and the sequence of costly fire seasons that spurred these developments made it clear that fuels reduction would remain the driving issue in forest management in the United States for the foreseeable future (Franklin and Agee 2003). The central message embedded in this policy shift is that the foregoing century of fire suppression and other management practice has disrupted the balance among land, resource conditions and values, as well as the people who rely on public and Indian lands for livelihood, raw materials, and senses of place (see Karjala and Dewhurst 2003; Moseley and Toth 2004).

Keywords: cultural resources, heritage resources, archaeology, fire regime, fire environment, fuels management, fire management, fire planning, wildfire, prescribed fire, First-Order fire effects, Second-Order fire effects, Third-Order fire effects, Burned Area Emergency Rehabilitation (BAER), fire severity, traditional cultural knowledge (TKE), cultural landscapes

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Citation:


Welch, John R. 2012. Effects of fire on intangible cultural resources: Moving toward a landscape approach [Chapter 8]. In: Ryan, Kevin C.; Jones, Ann Trinkle; Koerner, Cassandra L.; Lee, Kristine M., tech. eds. Wildland fire in ecosystems: effects of fire on cultural resources and archaeology. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 3. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 157-170.

 


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