Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (316 KB)

Title: Canopy accession patterns of table mountain and pitch pines during the 19th and 20th centuries

Author: Brose, Patrick H.; Waldrop, Thomas A.;

Date: 2012

Source: In: Butnor, John R., ed. Proceedings of the 16th biennial southern silvicultural research conference; 2011 Feb 14-17; Charleston, SC. e-Gen. Tech Rep. SRS-156. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 35-40.

Publication Series: Proceedings - Paper (PR-P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: A dendrochronology study was conducted in three upland yellow pine stands in Georgia to determine whether the individual Table Mountain (Pinus pungens) and pitch (P. rigida) pines originated in sunny gaps or shaded understories, whether they grew uninterrupted into the canopy or were assisted by one or more releases, and whether these strategies changed through time. From the three stands, 169 increment cores of the two pine species were obtained and analyzed for radial growth patterns using standard dendrochronological procedures. In the 1800s, approximately 80 percent of the pitch and Table Mountain pines originated in gaps with small gaps + release being the most common strategy. After 1900, large gaps without a followup release became the most common strategy. Many of these gaps were associated with known fires, hurricanes, or chestnut blight. Approximately 20 percent of both species originated in shaded understories, but more than half of these ascended to the canopy via one or more canopy releases. These canopy ascension strategies illustrate the importance of gaps in the dual fire - canopy disturbance regime and provide insight for managers seeking to maintain this rare forest type.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • This publication may be available in hard copy. Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
  • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Brose, Patrick H.; Waldrop, Thomas A. 2012. Canopy accession patterns of table mountain and pitch pintes during the 19th and 20th centuries. In: Butnor, John R., ed. Proceedings of the 16th biennial southern silvicultural research conference; 2011 Feb 14-17; Charleston, SC. e-Gen. Tech Rep. SRS-156. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 35-40.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.