Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (367 KB)

Title: Fuels management in the southern Appalachian Mountains, hot continental division

Author: Reilly, Matthew J.; Waldrop, Thomas A.; O’Brien, Joseph J.;

Date: 2012

Source: In: LaFayette, Russell; Brooks, Maureen T.; Potyondy, John P.; Audin, Lisa; Krieger, Suzanne L.; Trettin, Carl C. Eds. 2012. Cumulative watershed effects of fuel management in the Eastern United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-161. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 101-116.

Publication Series: Book Chapter

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: The Southern Appalachian Mountains, Hot Continental Mountains Division, M220 (McNab and others 2007) are a topographically and biologically complex area with over 10 million ha of forested land, where complex environmental gradients have resulted in a great diversity of forest types. Abundant moisture and a long, warm growing season support high levels of productivity across the area. Disturbances such as fire, severe windstorms, ice storms, and outbreaks of pathogens and insect infestations are common and can affect large areas. The interactions among these factors can produce a dynamic forest fuels situation, requiring frequent monitoring and updating of fuel loads. Fire exclusion since the early 20th century has allowed a buildup of fuels, both living and dead, across the Southern Appalachian Mountains. A rapidly expanding wildland-urban interface and the potential for climate change to increase the frequency and severity of wildfires will require that more resources be devoted to fuel management. In this new environment, managers will need more effective methods of fuel management to reduce the potential for hazardous wildfires and maintain landscape diversity.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Reilly, Matthew J.; Waldrop, Thomas A.; O’Brien, Joseph J. 2012. Fuels management in the southern Appalachian Mountains, hot continental division. In: LaFayette, Russell; Brooks, Maureen T.; Potyondy, John P.; Audin, Lisa; Krieger, Suzanne L.; Trettin, Carl C. Eds. 2012. Cumulative watershed effects of fuel management in the Eastern United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-161. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 101-116.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.