Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (0 bytes)

Title: Chapter 7: Developing collaboration and cooperation

Author: Bartlett, G.;

Date: 2012

Source: In: North, Malcolm, ed. 2012. Managing Sierra Nevada forests. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-237. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp. 81-88

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description:

Good forestry practices require onsite flexibility. A core concept in U.S. Forest Service General Technical Report PSW-GTR-220 "An Ecosystem Management Strategy for Sierran Mixed-Conifer Forests" (North et al. 2009) is that management treatments and thinning intensity should differ depending on local forest conditions and topographic location. In the absence of restricted forestry practices (e.g., stream exclusion zones, upper diameters for thinning, etc.), managers have to effectively communicate where and how different treatment decisions will be made. Using GTR 220 concepts requires effective outreach and project transparency. No single blueprint exists to achieve cooperation and trust as social context differs between projects, national forests, and stakeholders involved.

The objective of this chapter is to provide an example and analysis of a successful collaboration that may help projects find their own path to building public cooperation. Other forest management projects many not need professional mediation, yet some of the principles discussed here may be of value in any project involving public outreach. This chapter's example is a summary of how mediation and group collaboration led to settlement of one of the more litigated forest management projects in the Sierra Nevada-fuels treatments around the Dinkey Creek area on the Sierra National Forest.

For 15 years, conflict and litigation had stalled management practices on the Kings River project, which contains habitat used by a subpopulation of fisher. In 2009, with the help of an outside mediator, the Sierra National Forest Project Planning Forum successfully developed a proposed 5,000-ac (2023-ha) project—Dinkey Creek North and South based on GTR 220's conceptual framework. Subsequent to the successful project collaboration, the Sierra National Forest received significant Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration funding. Currently, the Sierra National Forest is proceeding with the environmental analysis, and is expanding the collaborative group's membership and project area.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Bartlett, G. 2012. Chapter 7: Developing collaboration and cooperation. In: North, Malcolm, ed. 2012. Managing Sierra Nevada forests. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-237. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp. 81-88.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.