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Title: Chapter 10: Geographic information system landscape analysis using GTR 220 concepts

Author: North, M.; Boynton, R.M.; Stine, P.A.; Shipley, K.F.; Underwood, E.C.; Roth, N.E.; Viers, J.H.; Quinn, J.F.;

Date: 2012

Source: In: North, Malcolm, ed. 2012. Managing Sierra Nevada forests. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-237. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp. 107-115

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Forest Service General Technical Report "An Ecosystem Management Strategy for Sierran Mixed-Conifer Forests" (hereafter GTR 220) (North et al. 2009) emphasizes increasing forest heterogeneity throughout a range of spatial scales including within-stand microsites, individual stands, watersheds, and entire landscapes. For fuels reduction, various landscape strategies have been proposed and modeled, but there are few conceptual models for integrating forest restoration and wildlife habitat at larger scales. General Technical Report 220 proposes varying forest structure, composition, and fuels based on topographic characteristics, particularly slope position and aspect. The concept is an effort to emulate how frequent fire might have created landscape-scale forest heterogeneity and by inference increased forest resilience and habitat connectivity. In this chapter, we describe a raster-based geographic information system (GIS) tool developed to parse a landscape into basic topographic categories. The Landscape Management Unit (LMU) tool has two versions. An initial version closely follows the methods described in Underwood et al. (2010), binning the landscape into three slope positions crossed with three aspects (resulting in nine total categories). A second version addresses application considerations that managers have identified within the U.S. Forest Service. It condenses some of the topographic categories present in version 1 while adding a category based on mechanical operation limitations that usually occur around >30 percent slopes, resulting in six total categories. The second version also allows for more user modification. The user can change how topographic categories are defined, allowing managers to more closely parameterize the GIS tool for a project's particular topographic conditions.

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North, M.; Boynton, R.M.; Stine, P.A.; Shipley, K.F.; Underwood, E.C.; Roth, N.E.; Viers, J.H.; Quinn, J.F. 2012. Chapter 10: Geographic information system landscape analysis using GTR 220 concepts. In: North, Malcolm, ed. 2012. Managing Sierra Nevada forests. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-237. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp. 107-115.

 


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