Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (3.7 MB)

Title: Ecology and management of the Prairie Division

Author: Anderson, Roger C.;

Date: 2012

Source: In: LaFayette, Russell; Brooks, Maureen T.; Potyondy, John P.; Audin, Lisa; Krieger, Suzanne L.; Trettin, Carl C. Eds. 2012. Cumulative watershed effects of fuel management in the Eastern United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-161. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 175-201.

Publication Series: Book Chapter

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Grasslands occurred on all continents, comprised almost 42 percent of the world’s plant cover, and once covered approximately 46 million km2 of the Earth’s surface. Grasslands contain few trees or shrubs, are dominated by grasses (members of the family Poaceae), and have a mixture of nongraminoid herbaceous species called forbs. Plant families most abundant as forbs are sunflower (Asteraceae) and pea (Fabaceae) families. No single climate characterizes grasslands and they occur in areas of the Earth that receive as little as 200 mm of precipitation annually to areas that receive 1300 mm, and in areas where average annual temperatures vary from 0 to 30 °C (Oesterheld and others 1999, Risser and others 1981, Sauer 1950). Grasslands are not necessarily treeless and they are transitional to savannas, which are characterized by higher densities of drought-tolerant, fire-resistant trees. The ratio of trees to grass increases as precipitation increases (Anderson and Bowles 1999, Curtis 1971, Oesterheld and others 1999); in landscapes receiving >650 mm of precipitation, the trend is for increasing cover of woody species with “long-term fire exclusion” (Sankaran and others 2004). In areas of low precipitation, grasslands grade into desert communities. Common features found among grasslands include: periodic droughts, frequent fires, landscapes that are level to gently rolling, and an abundance of grazing animals (Anderson 1982, 1990; Risser and others 1981, Sauer 1950).

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Anderson, Roger C. 2012. Ecology and management of the Prairie Division. In: LaFayette, Russell; Brooks, Maureen T.; Potyondy, John P.; Audin, Lisa; Krieger, Suzanne L.; Trettin, Carl C. Eds. 2012. Cumulative watershed effects of fuel management in the Eastern United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-161. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 175-201.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.