Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (0 bytes)

Title: Mesocarnivores as focal species for the restoration of post-logging aecond growth in the northern redwoods

Author: Slauson, Keith M.;

Date: 2012

Source: In: Standiford, Richard B.; Weller, Theodore J.; Piirto, Douglas D.; Stuart, John D., tech. coords. Proceedings of coast redwood forests in a changing California: A symposium for scientists and managers. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-238. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. pp. 437-447

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: The management of second growth forests to accelerate the restoration of late-successional and old growth characteristics will be one of the greatest challenges for conservation in the redwood region over the next century. In the redwood region, the largest complex of protected areas exists in the north, however >50 percent of these forest reserves are composed of logged, degraded second growth forests. Strategic restoration actions have the potential to accelerate the restoration of old growth forest characteristics and the old growth forest species assemblage that requires these features. Restoration actions in degraded aquatic habitats over the last two decades have been guided by the needs of several salmonid species. Currently there are no guidelines for how to strategically restore second growth forests based on the needs of old growth dependent wildlife species. We developed a focal species approach to provide restoration guidelines based on the spatial and compositional needs of the Humboldt marten (Martes americana humboldtensis), a mesocarnivore sensitive to the loss and modification of old growth forest conditions. In addition, two marten predators – the fisher (Martes pennanti) and bobcat (Lynx rufus) – were selected because they likely expanded their range or abundance, respectively, following the extensive logging of the 1900s. Successful restoration of the old growth forest mesocarnivore assemblage in the redwood region will require an increase in the amount and connectivity of old forest conditions and reduction of road densities which should result in the expansion of the remnant Humboldt marten population and decreases in the range and abundance of the fisher and bobcat.

Keywords: Martes, Humboldt marten, marten, mesocarnivores, second growth, restoration, focal species, redwood forest management

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Slauson, Keith M. 2012. Mesocarnivores as focal species for the restoration of post-logging aecond growth in the northern redwoods. In: Standiford, Richard B.; Weller, Theodore J.; Piirto, Douglas D.; Stuart, John D., tech. coords. Proceedings of coast redwood forests in a changing California: A symposium for scientists and managers. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-238. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. pp. 437-447.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.