Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (217 KB)

Title: Increased uniformity by planting clones will likely have a minimal effect on inventory costs

Author: VanderSchaaf, Curtis L.; Coble, Dean W.; South, David B.;

Date: 2012

Source: In: Butnor, John R., ed. 2012. Proceedings of the 16th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-156. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 359-362.

Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: When conducting inventories, reducing variability among tree diameters, heights, and ultimately volumes or biomass, can reduce the number of points/plots needed to obtain a desired level of precision. We present a simple analysis examining the potential reduction in discounted inventory costs when stand variability is decreased (via improved genetics and intensive management on a uniform soil). Sampling time might be reduced if the coefficient of variation in point volume/biomass estimates is reduced to 10% (versus 25% for genetically diverse stands). However, if this level of variability could be achieved (and depending on the desired probability and allowable percent error) discounted costs might be only reduced by $0.50 per acre for a single inventory (when a 15% error is used). When four inventories are made across a rotation (at ages 10 to 25 years) with a goal of 5% error, total discounted savings might be $20 to $30 per acre. On some very uniform sites, stands with low variability may only need one inventory plot per 25 acres. Although clones (in theory) might reduce variability, microsite conditions within a plantation will always produce variability among plots/points.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


VanderSchaaf, Curtis L.; Coble, Dean W.; South, David B. 2012. Increased uniformity by planting clones will likely have a minimal effect on inventory costs. In: Butnor, John R., ed. 2012. Proceedings of the 16th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-156. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 359-362.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.