Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (0 bytes)

Title: Long-term effects of thinning and fertilization on growth of red fir in northeastern California

Author: Zhang, Jianwei; Oliver, William W.; Powers, Robert F.;

Date: 2005

Source: Canadian Journal of Forest Research 35:1285-1293

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: To determine the impact of fertilization and thinning on red fir (Abies magnifica) stand growth and development, we established an experiment in a 60-year-old stand using a 2x3 factorial design with nitrogen fertilized and non-fertilized treatments and three stocking levels. Plots were established in 1976 and were measured every 5 years for 26 years. Fertilized trees grew 97%, 51%, 38%, and 33% more PAI basal area than non-fertilized trees during the first, second, third, and fourth 5-year periods, respectively. After that, non-fertilized trees grew more basal area per year. Annual volume increment response to fertilizer was not statistically significant until the fourth period. Yet, the fertilized plots grew 25-92% more volume than did the non-fertilized plots from 1976 to 1996. Similarly, lightly thinned plots grew more basal area than unthinned plots from the second period on until heavy mortality during 1996-2002. The heavily thinned plots grew more basal area from the fourth period on. Results indicate that red fir can respond to fertilization and thinning quickly and both treatments speed stand development. In addition, fertilization increases the stand’s carrying capacity. Therefore, forest managers can use these silvicultural practices to improve stand growth, to reduce fire fuels, and to accelerate stand development.

Keywords: Forest stand dynamics, growth and yield, density, fertilization

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Zhang, Jianwei; Oliver, William W.; Powers, Robert F. 2005. Long-term effects of thinning and fertilization on growth of red fir in northeastern California. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 35:1285-1293.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.