Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (0 bytes)

Title: The Scotia Plantation: implications for multiaged and even-aged silviculture

Author: O'Hara, Kevin L.;

Date: 2012

Source: In: Standiford, Richard B.; Weller, Theodore J.; Piirto, Douglas D.; Stuart, John D., tech. coords. Proceedings of coast redwood forests in a changing California: A symposium for scientists and managers. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-238. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. pp. 527-528

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description:

The Scotia Plantation was established in 1982 on the large alluvial flat south of Scotia and adjacent to the Eel River. Seedlings, from local "woods run" seed sources, were planted on a 3.1 x 3.1 m (10 x 10 ft) grid. Site quality was very high, with site index averaging greater than 45 m (50 yr base). In 1997, the area was divided into blocks and a series of thinning treatments were randomly assigned to these blocks. Thinning treatments included alternate row, diagonal row, every-third row, a double-alternate row, and a low density treatment. Plots were established and measured in the winter of 2002 to20003 and remeasured in 2007 after 5 growing seasons.

Stump sprout development following thinning treatments was very sensitive to available light resources. In the most heavily thinned treatment, the largest understory sprouts were up to 12.8 m (42 ft) in height and 12.7 cm (5 in) at dbh in only 10 years. However, at low light intensities many sprout clumps were completely dead. For example, in 2007 after 5 years, clump survival was only 9 percent in the third row treatment, but 100 percent in the low density treatment (O'Hara and Berrill 2010). Implications for multiaged silvicultural strategies suggest that treatments that create stump sprouts may not be sufficient by themselves for regenerating a new age class; additionally, light levels must also be sufficient to allow these sprouts to grow and survive. Our results suggest a light level of 40 percent of full sunlight is needed to sustain sprout height growth approaching 1 m/yr and light levels of 10 percent of full sunlight is needed for sprout survival. These sprout development results are published in more detail in O'Hara et al. (2007) and mortality patterns in O'Hara and Berrill (2010).

Volume increment for the Scotia Plantation was comparable to the fastest growing conifer plantations in the world. Periodic annual increment (PAI) ranged from 42.9 to72.6 m3/ha/yr (613 to 1082 ft3/ac/yr) depending on treatment (table 1). Mean annual increment (MAI) ranged from 15.4 to 40.0 m3/ha/yr (220 to 570 ft3/ac/yr); MAI was considerably lower than PAI suggesting MAI was far from culmination and that these values underestimate potential productivity for the Scotia Plantation. These results are comparable to the greatest production from other conifer and broadleaf plantations around the world and demonstrate the enormous production potential of coast redwood.

Keywords: Sequoia sempervirens, thinning, plantation management, forest production, coppice, sprout development

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


O'Hara, Kevin L. 2012. The Scotia Plantation: implications for multiaged and even-aged silviculture. In: Standiford, Richard B.; Weller, Theodore J.; Piirto, Douglas D.; Stuart, John D., tech. coords. Proceedings of coast redwood forests in a changing California: A symposium for scientists and managers. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-238. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. pp. 527-528.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.