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Title: The status of Lepidospartum burgessii (Burgess Broomshrub or Gypsum Broomscale)

Author: Lndyman, Juanita A. R.; Gegick, Patricia.;

Date: 2001

Source: In: Maschinski, Joyce; Holter, Louella, tech. eds. Southwestern rare and endangered plants: Proceedings of the Third Conference; 2000 September 25-28; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-23. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 116-127.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Lepidospartum burgessii is designated a Species of Concern by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This shrub is endemic to gypsum soils in north Culberson County, Texas and southern Otero County, New Mexico. In 1991-92 the condition and number of plants in New Mexico were examined but otherwise little was known about the ecology or biology of this species. Our objectives were to define its habitat characteristics and status. We found that L. burgessii colonizes more diverse habitats than previously thought. In New Mexico the plants generally grew on stabilized, microbiotic-covered, gypsum soils with approximately 5 percent basal vegetation-litter cover. In Texas, and at one site in New Mexico, shrubs grew on mobile gypsum dunes with an average of 20 percent basal vegetation-litter cover. In 1997 plants were counted in seven colonies in New Mexico. Approximately 15 percent of the individuals counted within those colonies in 1991-92 were dead in 1997 and the number of juvenile plants had declined. Recruitment was only by clonal propagation. No seeds formed, although there were abundant flowers. Involucre length was significantly longer from plants in Texas than from those in New Mexico, which suggests genetic diversity between the two populations. Two potential disease problems were identified: Corythuca marmorata (Tingidae, Hymenoptera), a known pathogen of some Asteraceae species, caused leaf loss and stem necrosis, and Alternaria alternata (Dematiaceae, Monilialales), a potential pathogenic fungus, was observed within some flowers.

Keywords: plant conservation, genetics, demography, reproductive biology, monitoring, endangered species

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Citation:


Lndyman, Juanita A. R.; Gegick, Patricia. 2001. The status of Lepidospartum burgessii (Burgess Broomshrub or Gypsum Broomscale). In: Maschinski, Joyce; Holter, Louella, tech. eds. Southwestern rare and endangered plants: Proceedings of the Third Conference; 2000 September 25-28; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-23. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 116-127.

 


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