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Title: Cultural influence as a factor in determining the distribution of a rare sage, Salvia dorrii subspecies mearnsii

Author: Huisinga, Kristin D.;

Date: 2001

Source: In: Maschinski, Joyce; Holter, Louella, tech. eds. Southwestern rare and endangered plants: Proceedings of the Third Conference; 2000 September 25-28; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-23. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 228-237.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Although related taxa occur throughout the western United States, Salvia dorrii ssp. mearnsii is endemic to central Arizona. In part, its narrow distribution may be attributed to prehistoric human influences. A spatial analysis was used to determine the relationship of archaeological sites and populations of S. dorrii ssp. mearnsii. In the lower Verde Valley, approximately 89 percent of the plant populations were spatially related to archaeological sites. Plant populations from a different geographic area in the upper Verde Valley were also spatially related to known archaeological remains, although only 75 percent of the time. Consultations with traditional scholars of three indigenous tribes, the Hopi, Paipai, and Kumiai, were conducted to gain a better understanding of the cultural significance of the plant and to aid in the interpretation of plant-archaeological remain relationships. The consultants indicated that certain taxa in the genus Salvia (S. dorrii var. dorrii and S. pachyphylla) are used in ceremonies and as medicine. These plant-archaeological site associations may be the result of prehistoric plant husbandry systems including trade and dispersal of seeds via Native American clan travel.

Keywords: plant conservation, genetics, demography, reproductive biology, monitoring, endangered species

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Huisinga, Kristin D. 2001. Cultural influence as a factor in determining the distribution of a rare sage, Salvia dorrii subspecies mearnsii. In: Maschinski, Joyce; Holter, Louella, tech. eds. Southwestern rare and endangered plants: Proceedings of the Third Conference; 2000 September 25-28; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-23. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 228-237.

 


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