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Title: Anthropology of fire in the Ozark Highland region

Author: Jurney, David H.;

Date: 2012

Source: In: Dey, Daniel C.; Stambaugh, Michael C.; Clark, Stacy L.; Schweitzer, Callie J., eds. Proceedings of the 4th fire in eastern oak forests conference; 2011 May 17-19; Springfield, MO. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-102. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 12-33.

Publication Series: Proceedings - Paper (PR-P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Native Americans are often considered to have exploited available natural resources rather than modifying their environments to maximize yields. As simpler societies evolved into more complex ones, there is a consensus that intensification of habitat modifications also increased. However, landscape scale archeological inventories now show relatively intensive modifications of specific landscapes through most of human history, including so-called simpler societies. Records of these modifications are difficult to obtain. Archeological site distributions can be used to understand human settlement and selection of particular ecosystems. Another method uses tree-ring dating (dendrochronology) on fire-scarred trees that recorded fire frequencies and fire return intervals at points on the landscape that frequently burned due to natural and cultural processes. General Land Office records (1815-1840) provide firm evidence for culturally-induced changes in species distribution and historical landscape vegetation mosaics for the Ozark Highlands and Arkansas River valley.

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Citation:


Jurney, David H. 2012. Anthropology of fire in the Ozark Highland region. In: Dey, Daniel C.; Stambaugh, Michael C.; Clark, Stacy L.; Schweitzer, Callie J., eds. Proceedings of the 4th fire in eastern oak forests conference; 2011 May 17-19; Springfield, MO. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-102. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 12-33.

 


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