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Title: A preliminary view of water quality conditions of the Upper Verde River [Chapter 8]

Author: Medina, Alvin L.;

Date: 2012

Source: In: Neary, Daniel G.; Medina, Alvin L.; Rinne, John N., eds. 2012. Synthesis of Upper Verde River research and monitoring 1993-2008. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-291. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 175-188.

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Stream water temperatures are of general interest because of interactive effects among physical, biological, and chemical parameters of water chemistry (Langford 1990). Water temperature regimes dictate the types of aquatic flora and fauna present within the aquatic system, as well as influence the system’s susceptibility to parasites and disease. These regimes are commonly noted in critical habitat designations as potentially limiting to native fish populations of Southwestern streams (Federal Register 2007). Temperatures that approach the upper thermal tolerances of Southwest native fishes have been noted in Arizona streams (Deacon and Minckley 1974; USDI Geological Survey 2005). Of particular interest are water temperatures for the UVR where spikedace (Meda fulgida) is imperiled. Recent fishery studies (Carveth and others 2006) suggest that native fishes are sensitive to annual and large temperature fluctuations. Reduced growth rates have been reported for some species (Widmer and others 2006). The relationships between desert fishes and water temperature are unclear, especially given the assumption that they should be capable of acclimating to hot and cold temperatures common to the Southwest.

Keywords: fluvial ecosystem, history, climate, soils, vegetation, geomorphology, watersheds, water quality, fish fauna, Upper Verde River

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Medina, Alvin L. 2012. A preliminary view of water quality conditions of the Upper Verde River [Chapter 8]. In: Neary, Daniel G.; Medina, Alvin L.; Rinne, John N., eds. 2012. Synthesis of Upper Verde River research and monitoring 1993-2008. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-291. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 175-188.

 


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