Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (4.7 MB)

Title: The Development of Cottonwood Plantations on Alluvial Soils: Dimensions, Volume, Phytomass, Nutrient Content and Other Characteristics

Author: Shelton, M. G.; Switzer, G. L.; Nelson, L. E.; Baker, J. B.; Mueller, C. W.;

Date: 1982

Source: Technical Bulletin 113. Mississippi State University, Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station. 46 p.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: Phytomass and nutrient accumulation are reported for eight intensively managed cottonwood plantations, ranging in age from four to 16 years on good sites. The results were developed from 24 sample trees and stand populations using the mean tree technique. The early growth of cottonwood plantations was rapid, and diameter and height growth averaged 3.6 cm and 2.6 m, respectively, during the first three years. At 16 years the mean tree was 33 cm in diameter, 32 m in height and had three logs to a 20-cm merchantability limit. From four to 16 years, the phytomass of the mean tree increased 13-fold while nutrient content increased 5- to 8-fold. The plantations maximized current annual increment for the stem components at 10 tons/ha during the fifth and sixth years, while that of crown components maximized during the first three years at 7 tons/ha. The foliage of the standing crop was 4 tons/ha through nine years, after which thinning caused a gradual decline to 2 tons/ha at 16 years. Thinnings removed 53 tons/ha of stem material with a total volume of 150 m³/ha. The mean annual increment of the stem maximized from eight to nine years at 7 tons/ha and 20 m³/ha and remained within 90% of the maximum from six to 14 years. The total net primary productivity through 16 years was about 180 tons/ha, of which 60% was stem components. The phytomass and volume yields from the system of management employed in these plantations were slightly below those reported for unthinned plantations and natural stands on similar sites. The annual nutrient requirements maximized from four to six years at 100, 12, 90, 150 and 18 kg/ha for N, P, K, Ca and Mg, respectively. By 14 years, the annual nutrient requirements declined to one half of the maximum levels. About two thirds of the annual requirements were necessary for foliage production. Much of the annual requirement was supplied through nutrient cycling. The patterns of plantation development, nutrition and productivity have distinct influences on the management of these plantations.

Keywords: Dimensions, Volume, Phytomass, Nutrient Content

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Shelton, M. G.; Switzer, G. L.; Nelson, L. E.; Baker, J. B.; Mueller, C. W. 1982. The Development of Cottonwood Plantations on Alluvial Soils: Dimensions, Volume, Phytomass, Nutrient Content and Other Characteristics. Technical Bulletin 113. Mississippi State University, Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station. 46 p.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.