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Publication Information

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Title: Biological control of purple loosestrife in North America

Author: Blossey, Bernd.;

Date: 1998

Source: In: Britton, Kerry O., ed. Exotic pests of eastern forests conference proceedings; 1997 April 8-10; Nashville, TN. U.S. Forest Service and Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council: 79-84.

Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: In recent years, interest in a biological method to control problem plants in natural areas in the United States has grown. All federal agencies must comply with standards to reduce the use and dependence on chemical control of weeds. But, biological methodologies are not readily available, nor have they been well-endorsed or financially supported. Despite an excellent safety record, skepticism concerning the safety and effectiveness of exotic insect introductions for weed control remains high among the general public, administrators, and even scientists. The successful control of Hypericum perforatum and others that followed, have demonstated that long-lasting, cost-effective, environmentally sound and effective control programs, can be implemented. But, despite an increase in the number of programs initiated, the ability to select and to establish control agents has not progressed to a point where the rate of success has improved. Basic questions about the kind of herbivore species to introduce, impact of single and multiple species herbivory, and release strategies, remain unanswered. The control program targeting purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.), a Eurasian wetland perennial responsible for the degradation of many prime wetlands throughout temperate regions of North America, is intended to emphasize the need for research investigations during pre- and post-release phases of the program.

Publication Notes:

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  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
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Citation:


Blossey, Bernd. 1998. Biological control of purple loosestrife in North America. In: Britton, Kerry O., ed. Exotic pests of eastern forests conference proceedings; 1997 April 8-10; Nashville, TN. U.S. Forest Service and Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council: 79-84.

 


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