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Publication Information

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Title: Dogwood anthracnose: how collaboration was used in the Southern United States to effectively deal with a new tree disease

Author: Anderson, Robert L.;

Date: 1998

Source: In: Britton, Kerry O., ed. Exotic pests of eastern forests conference proceedings; 1997 April 8-10; Nashville, TN. U.S. Forest Service and Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council: 165-174.

Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Dogwood anthracnose, caused by the fungus Discula destructiva was found in the Southern United States in 1987. Since that time millions of flowering dogwoods have been killed and disfigured by this disease. As soon as the disease was discovered a group of state and federal personnel formed a working group to develop an action plan for dealing with the disease. Collaboration was the key word from the beginning of the working group. A key to the success of the working group was a spirit of cooperation with out concern for who was going to get credit. Each time the working group met information was shared and cooperative action plans were developed to address the most pressing questions. The group established a network and mailing list where information was shared back and forth on a daily basis. The formation of a steering committee provided additional direction and organizations such as the Southern Appalachian Man in the Biosphere added additional support. As the issues on impact and rate of spread were addressed the focus of the working group shifted to research. The working group still meets to coordinate activities. Dogwood anthracnose was first reported as a disease of flowering dogwood Cornus florida L. in the United States in 1978. Since that time it has caused serious losses to flowering dogwoods in the forest and in ornamental plantings over large portions of the Eastern and Southern United States.

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Citation:


Anderson, Robert L. 1998. Dogwood anthracnose: how collaboration was used in the Southern United States to effectively deal with a new tree disease. In: Britton, Kerry O., ed. Exotic pests of eastern forests conference proceedings; 1997 April 8-10; Nashville, TN. U.S. Forest Service and Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council: 165-174.

 


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