Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (506 KB)

Title: Spatial distribution and properties of ash and thermally altered soils after high-severity forest fire, southern California

Author: Goforth, Brett R.; Graham, Robert C.; Hubbert, Kenneth R.; Zanner, C. William; Minnich, Richard A.;

Date: 2005

Source: International Journal of Wildland Fire. 14: 343–354

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: After a century of fire suppression, dense forests in California have fueled high-severity fires. We surveyed mixed conifer forest with 995–1178 trees ha-1 (stems > 10 cm diameter at breast height), and nearby pine–oak woodland having 175–230 trees ha-1, 51 days after a severe burn, to contrast the spatial extent and properties of thermally altered soil at sites with different tree densities. Water-repellent soils were more extensive in forest than woodland. Deposits of white ash, composed largely of calicite, covered at most ~25% of the land surface, in places where large fuel items (e.g. logs, branches, exfoliated oak bark) had thoroughly combusted. At least 1690 kg ha-1 of CaCO3 in ash was deposited over the forest, and at least 700 kg ha-1 was added to the woodland. Combustion of logs and large branches also reddened the underlying yellow-brown soil as deep as 60 mm (average 8 mm), and over ~1–12% of the land surface. The reddened soils have magnetic susceptibilities that are three to seven times greater than surrounding unreddened soils within the burn, indicating thermal production of maghemite. Such fire-altered conditions persist over spatial and temporal scales that influence soil genesis in Mediterranean-type climate regions.

Keywords: hydrophobic soil, maghemite, mixed conifer forest, reddened soil, soil magnetic susceptibility, soil pH, soil rubification, water-repellent soil, wood ash

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Goforth, Brett R.; Graham, Robert C.; Hubbert, Kenneth R.; Zanner, C. William; Minnich, Richard A. 2005. Spatial distribution and properties of ash and thermally altered soils after high-severity forest fire, southern California. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 14: 343–354

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.