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Title: The Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (CHATS)

Author: Patton, Edward G.; Horst, Thomas W.; Lenschow, Donald H.; Sullivan, Peter P.; Oncley, Steven; Burns, Sean; Guenther, Alex; Held, Andreas; Karl, Thomas; Mayor, Shane; Rizzo, Luciana; Spuler, Scott; Sun, Jielun; Turnipseed, Andrew; Allwine, Eugene; Edburg, Steven; Lamb, Brian; Avissar, Roni; Holder, Heidi E.; Calhoun, Ron; Kleissl, Jan; Massman, William; U, Kyaw Tha Paw; Weil, Jeffrey C.;

Date: 2008

Source: In: AMS 18th Symposium on Boundary Layers and Turbulence. Paper 18A.1. Boston, MA: American Meteorological Society. Online: https://ams.confex.com/ams/pdfpapers/139971.pdf

Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)

Description: Turbulence in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) well above the surface has been shown to be independent of the details of the surface roughness. In this region well-quantified similarity relationships work well when characterizing turbulent fluxes (e.g., Raupach, 1979). However, in the near-surface layer which is directly influenced by roughness elements, i.e., the roughness sublayer, turbulence exhibits dramatically varying properties depending on the detailed structure of the roughness elements (Shaw et al., 1974; Raupach, 1981; Raupach et al., 1996). Turbulence in the roughness sublayer is largely responsible for transporting momentum, heat and scalars between the surface and the flow aloft, and is directly coupled with the overlying larger-scale turbulence. Therefore, accurate characterization of fluxes within the roughness sublayer is crucial for predicting larger-scale atmospheric flow and scalar transport.

Keywords: turbulence, planetary boundary layer (PBL), surface, atmospheric flow, scalar transport

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Patton, Edward G.; Horst, Thomas W.; Lenschow, Donald H.; Sullivan, Peter P.; Oncley, Steven; Burns, Sean; Guenther, Alex; Held, Andreas; Karl, Thomas; Mayor, Shane; Rizzo, Luciana; Spuler, Scott; Sun, Jielun; Turnipseed, Andrew; Allwine, Eugene; Edburg, Steven; Lamb, Brian; Avissar, Roni; Holder, Heidi E.; Calhoun, Ron; Kleissl, Jan; Massman, William; U, Kyaw Tha Paw; Weil, Jeffrey C. 2008. The Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (CHATS). In: AMS 18th Symposium on Boundary Layers and Turbulence. Paper 18A.1. Boston, MA: American Meteorological Society. Online: https://ams.confex.com/ams/pdfpapers/139971.pdf

 


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