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Title: Direct seeding of fine hardwood tree species

Author: Farlee, Lenny D.;

Date: 2013

Source: In: Van Sambeek, J.W.; Jackson, Elizabeth A.; Coggeshall, Mark V.; Thomas, Andrew L.; Michler, Charles H. eds. 2013. Managing fine hardwoods after a half century of research: Proceedings of the Seventh Walnut Council Research Symposium; 2011 August 1-3; Madison, WI. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-115. Newtown Square, PA; U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 31-47.

Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Direct seeding of fine hardwood trees has been practiced in the Central Hardwoods Region for decades, but results have been inconsistent. Direct seeding has been used for reforestation and afforestation based on perceived advantages over seedling planting, including cost and operational efficiencies, opportunities for rapid seedling establishment and early domination of planting sites by desirable trees, improved tree form through increased competition, and ability to select the parentage of planting stock. Some barriers to successful direct seeding have included poor seed quality, improper handling or planting of seed, seed predation by rodents and other seed predators, and difficulty in establishing germinants due to competing vegetation. The literature and current field practice indicate direct seeding of black walnut, butternut, black cherry, American chestnut, and chestnut hybrids can be a viable regeneration technique, but success is dependent on proper seed collection, handling and sowing procedures, protection of seed from predation, and effective weed control maintained until seedlings are established.

Keywords: Juglans, plantation culture, nut production

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Citation:


Farlee, Lenny D. 2013. Direct seeding of fine hardwood tree species. In: Van Sambeek, J.W.; Jackson, Elizabeth A.; Coggeshall, Mark V.; Thomas, Andrew L.; Michler, Charles H. eds. 2013. Managing fine hardwoods after a half century of research: Proceedings of the Seventh Walnut Council Research Symposium; 2011 August 1-3; Madison, WI. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-115. Newtown Square, PA; U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 31-47.

 


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