Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (0 bytes)

Title: Reducing the spread of Phytophthora ramorum on the Redwood Nature Trail, Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, Curry County, Oregon: A Case Study

Author: Goheen, Ellen Michaels;

Date: 2013

Source: In: Frankel, S.J.; Kliejunas, J.T.; Palmieri, K.M.; Alexander, J.M. tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death fifth science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-243. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 141

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: In late August 2009, a 20.3 cm (8 in) diameter tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus (Hook. & Arn.) Manos, Cannon & S.H. Oh) adjacent to a popular hiking trail on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest was found infected with Phytophthora ramorum. The trail was immediately closed to the public. An eradication treatment consisting of injecting herbicide and cutting, piling, and burning tanoaks and other selected hosts in a 91.4 m (300 ft) radius around the infected tanoak was prescribed and completed by early winter. Close to 487.7 m (1600 ft) of trail lies within or on the boundary of the treatment area while approximately 61 m (200 ft) of trail pass through the heart of the infested zone. Knowing the potential for P. ramorum to persist in soils after treatment, options to reduce the risk of human-assisted spread of the pathogen via infested trail soil were discussed. Closing the trail permanently was not considered a viable option. A previous study suggested that, due to their antimicrobial activity, western red cedar (Thuja plicata Donn ex D. Don) heartwood chips placed on trails could help limit the number of P. ramorum spores in soils and the potential for new infections from splash dispersal. As a result, a 10.2 cm (4 in) thick layer of western redcedar heartwood chips was placed on the trailhead and through the center of the treated area. The trail was reopened to public use after the chip treatment was completed.

Keywords: Sudden oak death, Phytophthora ramorum, invasive species, tanoak, Notholithocarpus densiflorus, coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia, Japanese larch, Larix kaempferi

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Goheen, Ellen Michaels. 2013. Reducing the spread of Phytophthora ramorum on the Redwood Nature Trail, Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, Curry County, Oregon: A Case Study. In: Frankel, S.J.; Kliejunas, J.T.; Palmieri, K.M.; Alexander, J.M. tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death fifth science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-243. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 141.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.