Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (632 KB)

Title: Inferring controls on the epidemiology of beech bark disease from spatial patterning of disease organisms

Author: Garnas, Jeffrey R.; Houston, David R.; Twery, Mark J.; Ayres, Matthew P.; Evans, Celia.;

Date: 2013

Source: Agricultural and Forst Entomology. 15: 146-156.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: Spatial pattern in the distribution and abundance of organisms is an emergent property of collective rates of reproduction, survival and movement of individuals in a heterogeneous environment. The form, intensity and scale of spatial patterning can be used to test hypotheses regarding the relative importance of candidate processes to population dynamics. Using 84 plots across eastern North America, we studied populations of two associated plant parasites, the invasive felted beech scale Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind. and the native Neonectria fungi, which together cause beech bark disease (BBD). We evaluated spatial patterns at the scales of trees within stands, stands within the forest and forests within the landscape to examine four hypothetically important factors in the ecology of the disease: (i) local contagion within stands; (ii) regional contagion, or among patch infection-reinfection dynamics; (iii) variation in host susceptibility linked to genetic and/or environmental heterogeneity; and (iv) climate effects on population growth of BBD organisms. Analyses revealed an unexpected lack of spatial aggregation in BBD populations among trees, stands and forests. This implies that propagule pressure is generally sufficiently high throughout the infested region of North America such that neither trees nor stands are spared from the disease by dispersal limitations of the disease agents. Furthermore, variation in tree and stand level susceptibility has minimal impact on BBD dynamics and climate is not a conspicuous driver of abundance within the core range of BBD.

Keywords: Beech bark disease, Cryptococcus fagisuga, forest pestilence, Neonectria ditissima, Neonectria faginata, spatial epidemiology

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • This publication may be available in hard copy. Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
  • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Garnas, Jeffrey R.; Houston, David R.; Twery, Mark J.; Ayres, Matthew P.; Evans, Celia. 2013. Inferring controls on the epidemiology of beech bark disease from spatial patterning of disease organisms. Agricultural and Forst Entomology. 15: 146-156.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.