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Title: When will female jaguars cross the border? Socio-demographics of the northern jaguar

Author: Warshall, Peter;

Date: 2013

Source: In: Gottfried, Gerald J.; Ffolliott, Peter F.; Gebow, Brooke S.; Eskew, Lane G.; Collins, Loa C. Merging science and management in a rapidly changing world: Biodiversity and management of the Madrean Archipelago III and 7th Conference on Research and Resource Management in the Southwestern Deserts; 2012 May 1-5; Tucson, AZ. Proceedings. RMRS-P-67. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 87-90.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Conservation biologists, NGOs, and the USFWS have established a goal of returning a viable population of jaguars into the United States. The source population for this recovery will come from Sonora, Mexico, the closest sub-population of the species. To maintain a viable population there must be females and an active corridor that allows passage of jaguars between Sonora, Arizona, and New Mexico. While considerable attention has been paid to the corridor, little attention has been paid to the potential rate of expansion of the existing population and the importance of female jaguars to dispersal. This paper’s purpose is to highlight what is known of the socio-demographics of northern jaguars, the differing role that females play in dispersal, the possible return-times for females to the U.S. Sky Islands, as well as conservation priorities.

Keywords: Madrean Archipelago, Sky Islands, southwestern United States, northern Mexico, natural environment, fauna, flora, research, management, biodiversity, climate change

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Citation:


Warshall, Peter. 2013. When will female jaguars cross the border? Socio-demographics of the northern jaguar. In: Gottfried, Gerald J.; Ffolliott, Peter F.; Gebow, Brooke S.; Eskew, Lane G.; Collins, Loa C. Merging science and management in a rapidly changing world: Biodiversity and management of the Madrean Archipelago III and 7th Conference on Research and Resource Management in the Southwestern Deserts; 2012 May 1-5; Tucson, AZ. Proceedings. RMRS-P-67. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 87-90.

 


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