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Title: Review of black-tailed prairie dog reintroduction strategies and site selection: Arizona reintroduction

Author: Hale, Sarah L.; Koprowski, John L.; Hicks, Holly;

Date: 2013

Source: In: Gottfried, Gerald J.; Ffolliott, Peter F.; Gebow, Brooke S.; Eskew, Lane G.; Collins, Loa C. Merging science and management in a rapidly changing world: Biodiversity and management of the Madrean Archipelago III and 7th Conference on Research and Resource Management in the Southwestern Deserts; 2012 May 1-5; Tucson, AZ. Proceedings. RMRS-P-67. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 310-315.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: The black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) was once widely distributed throughout the western United States; however, anthropogenic influences have reduced the species’ numbers to 2 percent of historical populations. Black-tailed prairie dogs are described as a keystone species in the grassland ecosystem, and provide many unique services, including burrows for other species (e.g. burrowing owls [Athene cunicularia] and rattlesnakes [Crotalus spp.]), nutrient rich soil that, in turn, provides rich vegetation for grazers, and food for many carnivores and birds of prey. Several efforts have been made to reestablish this species to its historical range. In southeastern Arizona, a recent reintroduction effort was built upon work of scientists that identified potential suitable areas with characteristics similar to those of existing prairie dog colonies in Mexico. Prairie dogs were first translocated to the sites in 2008, and individuals still remain on the landscape today. We compare this to other reestablishment efforts, and provide suggestions on ways to increase success of future reintroductions.

Keywords: Madrean Archipelago, Sky Islands, southwestern United States, northern Mexico, natural environment, fauna, flora, research, management, biodiversity, climate change

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Citation:


Hale, Sarah L.; Koprowski, John L.; Hicks, Holly. 2013. Review of black-tailed prairie dog reintroduction strategies and site selection: Arizona reintroduction. In: Gottfried, Gerald J.; Ffolliott, Peter F.; Gebow, Brooke S.; Eskew, Lane G.; Collins, Loa C. Merging science and management in a rapidly changing world: Biodiversity and management of the Madrean Archipelago III and 7th Conference on Research and Resource Management in the Southwestern Deserts; 2012 May 1-5; Tucson, AZ. Proceedings. RMRS-P-67. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 310-315.

 


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