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Title: Managing saltcedar after a summer wildfire in the Texas Rolling Plains

Author: Fox, Russell; Mitchell, Rob; Davin, Mike;

Date: 2001

Source: In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 236-237.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Saltcedar (Tamarix spp) has invaded nearly one million acres of riparian ecosystems in the southwestern U.S., displacing many native species. The objectives of this study were to estimate saltcedar mortality to summer wildfire, summer wildfire followed by rollerchopping, and dormant season treatment with 25 percent triclopyr to regrowth following a summer wildfire at Lake Meredith National Recreation Area. In July 1998, more than 100 acres of saltcedar-infested riparian area were burned. In February and March of 1999, regrowth of 200 dormant saltcedar trees were treated with 25 percent triclopyr in JLB oil using the basal bark treatment method. Rollerchopping was conducted in June 1999. Trees that were sprayed had multiple stems and were an average of 4 feet tall. Saltcedar mortality following the summer wildfire was 60.6 percent. Rollerchopping burned areas resulted in 85.1 percent mortality. Saltcedar mortality was 89.9 percent following the February herbicide treatment and 94.5 percent following treatment in March. Preliminary results indicate that dormant season individual plant treatment with 25 percent triclopyr following burning is an effective method for managing saltcedar infestations. However, rollerchopping burned areas may be the most economical in large, alluvial flood plains.

Keywords: wildland shrubs, genetics, biodiversity, disturbance, ecophysiology, community ecology

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Fox, Russell; Mitchell, Rob; Davin, Mike. 2001. Managing saltcedar after a summer wildfire in the Texas Rolling Plains. In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 236-237.

 


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